Do I need to bring anything to class?
Yourself, water and snacks as classes are not always held within easy reach of food outlets. Please wear fight friendly clothes such as gym clothing and trainers, no jeans or boots. Please remember to remove jewellery and turn off your mobile phone.

 

Do I need a partner?
No, most people attend on their own and by the end of their first class they have a new set of fight buddies.

 

Where is class?
Training Tuesday's: BADC Standard, Intermediate Single Weapon (ISW), Advanced Single Weapon (ASW) and Scuffle & Punch and are held at Caxton House, Archway, N19 3RQ. Some additional Sunday rehearsals are held at ALRA (The Academy of Live and Recorded Arts). Royal Victoria Patriotic Buildings, Wandsworth. London. SW18 3SX. For all other intensives and workshops please check the appropriate Training page on our website, our Facebook page or, if in doubt, email or call us, we wont bite…honest!

 

What is Scuffle & Punch?
Scuffle and Punch is a weekly class on a Tuesday evening, during term time, from 7pm to 9.30pm at Caxton House. They are individual, one off training classes, open to all levels which explorine a range of themes from Acting the Fight to Carrying Pain. Each week’s class will be announced on social media. You can block book the whole term, several classes in advance or just drop in on the night. 

 

Intensives or weekly courses?
It depends on how you like to work. Intensives are very focused and it allows you to concentrate and immerse yourself in your Stage Combat training for 5 to 10 days. Weekly courses allow you time to assimilate, reflect and to practice…Practice is essential.

 

Can I pay on the day/night?
Yes, if you are attending a drop in class such as Scuffle & Punch, otherwise, full payment is required in advance once you have filled in a registration form.

 

Do I need to book a place?
Yes, by filling in an online registration. If dropping in to Scuffle & Punch you may fill in a paper registration form on the night. Please check with ruth@rc-annie.com that there are still places available.

 

Why is Stage Combat training important for an actor?

  • Why not? It is highly likely that you will be required to perform some form of physical action from a slap, trip or fall to a full on sword or gun fight in your professional career.
  • Stage Combat is a unique combination of all the actor’s disciplines: voice, movement and performance.
  • Demanding a greater awareness and ability to use your body, you will use stage combat training far more than you expect in your professional work.
  • You will gain a physical vocabulary that will aid your rehearsal process and can help protect you from injury.
  • The rehearsal process is rarely long enough for the Fight Director to train the actors for the physical work demanded by the production. The Fight Director is much more likely to create the action based on the actors physicality and skill level. Which is why training and experience is so highly valued.
  • If you are committed and train with dedication you never know where it will lead, it may create new and wonderful career opportunities.

What will I learn?

  • Lots!
  • To safely perform scenes of dramatic combat.
  • The BADC syllabus and terminology.
  • About yourself as an actor, how to act repeatedly ‘in the moment’ - you can do nothing else when performing a staged fight.
  • Trust yourself and your partner.
  • How to tell the story of a fight.
  • How to improve your coordination and gain confidence.
  • How to read your partner’s movements and respond accordingly. This will help you give effective performances and also keep you safe.
  • The principals inherent when performing stage combat: sensitivity of touch, preserving energy, looking aggressive but remaining relaxed and aware.
  • 3D mapping, spacial awareness and the ability to adjust your movements to suit the location and situation.

 

Do I have to start young to get good at it?
Absolutely not, many actors come to stage combat initially through drama school and then continue their training after a few years of being out in the world. Many come back years later. We cater for all levels of fitness and ability, we work with what ever you bring us.

 

Will this make me fit?
Depends how much you do! It can certainly help to improve your fitness and endurance levels. One of the key skills is footwork, time spent sitting in an engarde certainly uses your leg muscles. You will also develop your core and strengthen muscles essential for fight performance.

 

How quickly can I get to BADC Advanced?
Well that’s kinda down to you and how you learn. You will need to complete BADC Standard, Intermediate and then the Advanced level. This can be achieved in a year but there is always plenty to learn in this Art Form and the more you train, the more you realise there is so much more to learn. Once you have your Advanced level you can keep adding Advanced Single Weapon Certifications (ASW) to your Training Certification Record (TCR) or attend Scuffle and Punch classes to keep your skills well oiled.

 

What can I do with these skills?

  • Stick it on your C.V.
  • Perform exciting and effective stage fights on stage and screen, be adaptable to direction and the people you have to fight.
  • Stay safe.
  • Once you achieve a Distinction at Advanced you could join the Rc-Annie Fight Team for Film and Theatre work

 

What is the BADC?
The British Academy of Dramatic Combat which is the oldest Stage Combat Academy in the world, established in 1969. Most Academies were originally based on the BADC’s system in some way.

 

What BADC levels are there?
Standard, Intermediate, Intermediate Single Weapon (ISW), Advanced Advanced Single Weapon (ASW), Advanced and  Weapon Specialisation (WS).